Some simple conversation tips

Thu, 31. August 2017

Sometimes a conversation is not that meaningful because you waste too much time and don't get to a point. We have some tips for you on how you can have a more meaningful conversation.

 

 

1. Decrease personal barriers

 

There is a prejudice that you have to be very professional when you talk for the first time to another person. Most people feel more forced to act like they are someone they are not. Try to make a real conversation that shows your personality and if there is an opportunity to joke around or personalize the conversation than take the chance. The others are just humans as well and also like to decrease barriers from the start. This way the following conversation will be more easy going and honest.

 

2. Let others speak as well

 

People can tell if you listen to what they are saying or if you just pretend listening to their story. Sometimes you already have a thought that you would like to speak out and can't wait to tell the other person the experience you made. It is important though that you listen to the other person as well. If your story is interesting, it will be still interesting in a few minutes.

 

3. Let others talk about themselves first

 

If you want to sell something to someone you should let the other person start talking first about him/herself. It seems more natural when you try to sell yourself afterwards. If the person is interested in what you have to say and offer, it will be easier for you to make a transition into a pitch. This way it won't seem to fake and forced. It is common that a person will have a need about something you just talked about.

 

4. Don't waste people's time

 

Talking to a person for half an hours does not mean that the conversation is more meaningful than with someone you talked to for just 5-10 minutes. Most people appreciate it when you value their time, especially when they are very busy. You should make sure to cover the importance of your conversation and how you can help each other out. You don't always need the small talk. Cut it out and deliver value.

 

5. Ask smart questions that show you’re interested

 

You want to show the other person that you are engaged? Express a natural curiosity for what he/she is telling you. Before you switch to the next topic you should ask at least one question that is related to the topic. In order to this you show that you're interested in the conversation and the likelihood will be higher that you establish a connection with the other person.

 

6. Offer a helping hand

 

You can stay in someone’s mind by offering a helping hand. There are a lot of people who offer their help but most people just say this to be polite. Just a few people actually deliver their promise. Be different to stay in mind, so people value the relationship to you. You could give them a contact, a tool or even a sounding board in order to contact you.

 

7. Listen and remember key points

 

When you are having a conversation you should not just seem like you’re interested. You should actually listen and filter out key points. What is the other person interested in? You should keep in mind what others are passionate about. During the next conversation you should ask for an update. You remembered that he/she likes to travel? Ask in the beginning of the conversation if he/she already has a next trip planned. People will take you more serious because they notice that you actually pay attention.

 

8. Involve everybody into your talk

 

When you are having a conversation with more than one person try to involve the other ones as well. People tend to focus on one person during a conversation. But there are always "outsiders" who are more quit and sometimes we forget to talk to them. This person might turn into someone that could be very relevant to you.

 

Keep these tips in mind when you go to your next meetings or conferences. You should have a look at the list the next time before you meet new important people. You will experience less wasted time and new opportunities.       

 

 

Author: Laura Tüttelmann

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